The Blue Garden House by Fran Silvestre

Photography
Fran Silvestre Arquitectos
Architect
Fran Silvestre

The Blue Garden House is a renovated project designed by architect Fran Silvestre and located in Valencia, Spain.

With its 400 square meters of living space and 400 square meters of terrace, the architect intended to give as much importance to the interior spaces as to the exterior areas of the habitation.

“The most important part of a project is to know where to stop. If you are doing a painting, you have to ask yourself where to stop. After a point, if you put more things, the project becomes worse”

Fran Silvestre

Traffic inside the house organises around a central block containing the stairs leading to the upper floor. Two parallel corridors with different aspects lead to different parts of the house:

The first one with a more public character points to the kitchen and the dining room. The second corridor has a more intimate and private connotation and therefore leads to the bedrooms. Both longitudinal passageways offer a passage of approximately 50 meters long, outwardly associating the road with the back porch and the yard square.

Between the more intimate interior spaces of the house and the exterior terrace is an intermediate lounge that can act as the primary and most significant room of the house. This space is equipped with seatings and gathering areas, while characterised by two large openings that give access to the terrace and introduce natural light and blue sky into the centre of the house.

When asked about the white colour choice, Fran Silvestre’s reply included three reasons. The first concerning the Mediterranean climate where the white colour is often used in houses to avoid overheating. The second reason is to give a sense of spaciousness to the house, by giving it a white painted interior that makes the rooms look more larger. The third and last reason is that he finds a white colour very beautiful.

Fran Silvestre has always been able to demonstrate a minimalist approach in his architectural projects. However, his choices come from very rational thinking that emphasises the efficiency aspect of the minimalistic approach over the beautiful part of it.

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